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Abstract Submission Guidelines

Dear visitors, kindly note that detailed submission guidelines are towards the bottom of the page. You may also find detailed steps on how to use the Easy Academia Submission system. Clicking on the desired submission type or submission step will expand the section with more information.

If you have already submitted to the conference and wish to register, please visit the Registration Page for more details.

Click here to download the Abstract Submission Guidelines in pdf format.

Abstracts will be submitted by topic to the different tracks of the conference. Abstracts must be submitted by the presenting author. Submitting authors are requested to carefully check the entire list of tracks to ensure they submit to the most appropriate track.

Each track will be chaired by two track chairs appointed by the Scientific Committee. The track chairs will assess the submissions within their tracks. The Scientific Committee has the final decision on the inclusion of abstracts and on the final presentation format and time.

How are abstracts assessed for inclusion in the scientific programme?

  • The abstract content should be explicitly linked to an aspect of health psychology.
  • The abstract content must be received on time and presented in the appropriate format (details below).
  • The submission has not been presented at a previous EHPS conference and has not been published.
  • The study must have followed the standards of ethics in research with human beings and obtained appropriate ethical approval (if an empirical study).
  • Submissions of primary and secondary empirical research must include analyses and a summary of findings. It is not sufficient to state “the data will be analysed” or “findings will be presented/discussed”.
  • Spelling, grammar and English are satisfactory.
  • The abstract does not exceed the word limit.

Submissions of good quality research meeting these criteria will be accepted for inclusion in the scientific programme. However, as many more abstracts are submitted for oral presentations than there are available slots within the programme, the Scientific Committee will decide which submissions to include as oral or poster presentations. This decision requires balancing the abstracts submitted with the ideal programme, which includes high-quality research and reflects contributions from a range of topics, theoretical perspectives, and methodologies.

The most common reasons for rejecting abstracts are:

  • Incomplete or insufficient empirical evidence reported in the abstract;
  • Did not include theories or applications directly relevant to the discipline of health psychology;
  • The guidelines on abstract submission were not adhered to;
  • The abstract arrived after the deadline for submission.

The maximum number of presentations for presenting authors is one oral presentation (including in a symposium, but excluding roundtables) and one poster presentation. There is no limit on the number of presentations as a non-presenting co-author.

All accepted abstracts will be published as an online abstract book and as a supplementary online issue of the European Health Psychologist (EHP)It is assumed authors give consent and authorise the Scientific Committee to publish their abstract. Please note that presenting authors of all accepted abstracts must register and pay the conference registration fee by the deadline for early registration. The abstracts of authors who fail to do so will be removed from the program and will not be published in the final abstract book or in the EHP. 

Types of submissions

Presentations can be submitted in one of the following formats

Oral presentation

Oral presentations typically describe original empirical research or meta-analyses and reviews. They can also include “important replications” (please state in the abstract what this study is replicating and why this is important) or describe “lessons learned” from problems and pitfalls in specific research projects (for the presentation format, please see the “lessons learned” in the poster section below). The maximum number of presentations for presenting authors is one oral presentation.

Most oral presentations will be allocated by the track chairs to a 20-minute slot, divided as follows: 15 minutes talk, 4 minutes discussion, 1 minute change of presenters. Some presentations will be allocated to a 10-minute slot (i.e., an 8-minute talk). The decision to allocate presentations to a 20-minute or a 10-minute slot or a poster (due to a large number of oral submissions) will be made by the track chairs and approved by the Scientific Committee.

Abstracts should include:

Title: 15 words or less

Author(s) details (name and affiliation): First name(s) followed by surname(s); Institution of affiliation, country. Authors should be no more than 10. The first author is the presenting author.

The body of the text should be no longer than 180 words and include:

Background: State the primary objectives of the study, including the main research questions, aims or theory being tested.

Methods: Quantitative studies should include design, participants (including number of participants), measures; qualitative studies should include design, participants, methods of data collection and analysis, e.g. grounded theory, discourse analysis, and IPA.

Findings: Quantitative studies should include a summary of the results; qualitative studies should include a description of the main findings such as the themes or categories generated. Note: it is not acceptable to state “findings will be presented”.

Discussion: Conclusions and/or some discussion of the possible contribution to, or implications for, health psychology. Note: it is not acceptable to state “results will be discussed”.

Please do not include a list of references at the end of your abstract.

Overview talk

These are 30-minute talks (+ 10 minutes for discussion) that provide an extended presentation of a topic, a theory, or an innovative line of research. They should be of special interest to a wide audience. Only two such talks will be included in the conference program. If you wish to compete for these special overview talks, please submit a 300-word abstract accompanied by a short statement justifying an extended talk by January 16th to the Chair of the Scientific Committee (Yael Benyamini, ). These submissions will be judged by the Scientific Committee by the end of January (to allow submission of a regular presentation if not accepted; if accepted, this talk counts as the one oral presentation allowed per presenter). 

Poster presentation

There is a maximum of one poster per presenting author.

Poster presentations can be of the following types:

a. Regular poster

These posters present original empirical research or reviews. The abstracts follow the same format as those for oral presentations, see above.

b. Lessons learned

Since, very often, problems in research tend to be very informative, these posters will be devoted to discussing lessons learned from problems and pitfalls in specific research projects.

Abstracts for “Lessons learned” posters should include:

Title: 15 words or less

Author(s) details (name and affiliation): Name: first name(s) followed by surname(s); Institution of affiliation, country. Authors should be no more than 10. The first author is the presenting author.

The body of the text should be no longer than 180 words and include:

Background: State the primary objectives of the study, including the main research questions, aims or theory being tested.

Methods: Quantitative studies should include design, participants (including number of participants), measures and qualitative studies should include design, participants, methods of data collection and analysis, e.g. grounded theory, discourse analysis, and IPA.

What went wrong: Describe the limitations/obstacles faced in conducting the research

Possible solutions: Describe possible solutions (If any)

Conclusions: What have we learnt from this?

c. Work in progress

This type allows researchers to present and share work in progress. Although these posters do not require data collection to be completed, the work still has to be of a demonstrably good scientific quality to be accepted. Consequently, the abstract should have clear and explicit aims and objectives, hypotheses or research questions; methods should be clearly described, with an explicit statement of intended sample size and justification for this; a clear plan of analysis should be outlined, which should make clear how the intended analyses will address the research aims or research question; and the discussion section should clarify the expected or potential implications of the research.

Abstracts for “Work in progress” posters should include:

Title: a title of 15 words

Author(s) details (name and affiliation). Name: first name(s) followed by surname(s); Institution of affiliation, country. Authors should be no more than 10. The first author is the presenting author.

The body of the text should be no longer than 180 words and include:

Background: State the primary objectives of the study, including the main research questions, aims or theory being tested.

Methods: Quantitative studies should include design, participants (including number of participants), measures and analyses; qualitative studies should include design, participants, methods of data collection and analysis, e.g. grounded theory, discourse analysis, and IPA.

Expected results: Describe the preliminary or expected results.

Current stage of work: Describe the stage you are in terms of the work described.

Discussion: Some discussion of the possible contribution to, or implications for, health psychology.

Please do not include a list of references at the end of your abstract.

d. Hands-on interventions

This will allow for presentation of interventions and intervention material, if possible in terms of the facilities and equipment needed and linguistic barriers. Submitting a proposal for presenting hands-on interventions is allowed in addition to the one poster per person limit.

Abstracts for “Hand-on interventions” should include:

Title: 15 words or less

Author(s) details (name and affiliation): First name(s) followed by surname(s); Institution of affiliation, country. Authors should be no more than 10. The first author is the presenting author.

Required equipment: The conference may be able to provide a computer and projector. Any other equipment will need to be provided by the presenters. Please list the equipment you will need from the conference in order to present your intervention.

The body of the text should be no longer than 180 words and include:

Background: State the primary objectives of the intervention, including the aims or theory being tested.

Methods: Briefly describe the design, participants (including number of participants), measures, and intervention protocol.

Findings: These could be findings from an empirical evaluation of the intervention or could be more descriptive.

Discussion: Some discussion of the lessons learned and the possible contribution to, or implications for, health psychology.

Please do not include a list of references at the end of your abstract.

Symposia

Symposia provide an opportunity for focused presentations of a particular topic. A symposium consists of 4 oral presentations and a discussant or five oral presentations, each 20 minutes long, from different authors on a related theme (totaling 100 minutes). The authors should be from at least two different countries, preferably more. Presenters in a symposium cannot submit an additional oral presentation.

The convenor must submit the symposium details (see below), symposium overview abstract and the timetable indicating the running order of the sections. Each of the symposium participants must then submit the abstract of their own presentation with its respective details (linked to the symposium by its code, see below).

Symposium details:

Title: 15 words or less.

Convenor details (name and affiliation): First name(s) followed by surname(s); institution of affiliation, country.
There can be one or maximum two convenors, but only one has the responsibility of the symposium.

Chair details (name and affiliation): First name(s) followed by surname(s); institution of affiliation; country. There can be up to two chairs. The chair may be the same person as the convenor.

Discussant details: First name followed by surname; institution of affiliation; country.
After the presentations, the discussant provides an overview of the main issues (about 10 minutes) and facilitates a general discussion of the topic by the audience and the authors.

Symposium overview abstract (maximum 300 words) including:

Aims: four or five points that summarise what you expect the symposium to achieve.

Rationale: explaining why it is important to discuss this issue at this year’s conference.

Summary: outlining the symposium as a whole and integrating the individual contributions.

Timetable indicating the running order of the sections (prepare as a separate file, to be uploaded in the submission process).

Submission: All items listed up to this point will be submitted by the symposium convenor. Following this submission, the convenor will receive a code for the symposium and send it to the presenting authors. Then each author will submit her/his individual abstract, using the code to link it to the symposium. Please note that the overview and all abstracts of the symposium must be submitted to the same track.

Abstracts for individual symposium presentations: Please follow the submission guidelines for an oral presentation for the format of the abstract.

Please do not include a list of references at the end of your abstract.

Roundtables, Debates and Participatory Sessions

A roundtable or debate provides an opportunity to take forward an issue of relevance to health psychology by critiquing current evidence and suggesting future directions for research and applications.

roundtable or debate should focus on a topical issue and discuss it from different perspectives. The contributors should provide summaries of their perspectives on the issue that are sufficient to enable delegates to be actively involved in the structured discussion. These structured discussions should provide an original contribution to the debate in the area. The roundtable format is a series of maximum five presentations from different presenters, across two or more institutions, and an interactive discussion period. The session should last for 100 minutes. The presentations should have a clear structure and require active participation with delegates during the general discussion. They should not be unfocussed, informal discussions around a topic.

Variations on this format, which involve greater audience participation, are welcome. If you wish to submit such a creative variation, please inquire before submission with the Chair of the Scientific Committee (Yael Benyamini, ).

Participation in a roundtable or debate can be in addition to an oral presentation.

The proposal must be submitted by the roundtable convenor and should include:

Title: 15 words or less.

Convenor(s) details (name and affiliation): First name(s) followed by surname(s); institution of affiliation, country.

There can be one or maximum two convenors, but only one has the responsibility for the roundtable. The convenor(s) also serves as the chairperson who takes responsibility for leading the discussion and asking questions.

Contributors’ details (name and affiliation): First name(s) followed by surname(s); Institution of affiliation, country.

For debates there should be no more than 3 contributors.

For roundtables there should be no more than 5 contributors.

Roundtable overview abstract (maximum 400 words) including:

Purpose: a statement of focus to be addressed by this discussion.

Objectives: up to four objectives, summarising what you expect the discussion to achieve.

Rationale: a rationale for addressing this issue at this conference.

Summary: outlining the context or focus of each contributor’s research / approach.

Timetable indicating the running order of the sections (prepare as a separate file, to be uploaded in the submission process).

Please do not include a list of references at the end of your abstract.

Workshop

This category refers to workshops provided on Tuesday, September 1st, 2015, before the official opening of the conference.

A workshop provides an opportunity for a group of participants to achieve a specific goal or address a particular problem. It may be designed to train or educate participants in a particular research methodology or theoretical approach, or to address a specific problem, such as how to use particular research findings in health care or policy. A workshop can also be a useful way to develop a consensus on a particular issue. For example, the goal of the workshop may be to produce a position statement or policy on a particular topic, to identify priorities in a specific area or to develop theoretical perspectives or methodologies. It should have a clear structure and require active participation by everyone involved.

Contributors should state whether they prefer a half-day or full-day conference workshop. The proposal must be submitted by the workshop convenor and must include:

Title:  a title of 15 words or less.

Facilitator(s) details (name and affiliation): First name(s) followed by surname(s); Institution of affiliation, country.

There can be one or maximum two convenors, but only one has the responsibility of the workshop.

Facilitators should be experts in the topic.

Workshop overview abstract (maximum 300 words) including:

Objectives: up to four objectives, summarising what you expect the workshop to achieve and issues to be addressed.

Activities: an indication of the activities that will be undertaken during the workshop.

Description of the intended participants.

The maximum number of participants for the workshop.

Conflict of interest: Convenor(s) are required to disclose any potential conflict of interest they may have in relation to the content of the proposed workshop (this disclosure is not included in the word limit).

Please also note that:

Conference workshops should focus on topics of the conference tracks and be of broad relevance to health psychology such as methods, scientific writing, intervention techniques and development strategies, evaluation strategies, health behavior theories, implementing health psychology into practice, critical reading, etc.

Full-day workshops are reimbursed with 250 Euros per workshop (not per facilitator) and half-day workshops are reimbursed with 125 Euros per workshop (not per facilitator) by the EHPS. Workshops will take place providing a sufficient number of participants apply to ensure the workshop is financially viable. If only a small number of participants register for a workshop, the EHPS has the right to cancel it up to four weeks ahead of the conference.

Using the submission system

Below you may find quick information and steps on how to submit using the Easy Academia system.